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Saturday, November 10, 2018

Some Arctic Ground No Longer Freezing—Even in Winter

New data from two Arctic sites suggest some surface layers are no longer freezing. If that continues, greenhouse gases from permafrost could accelerate climate change.

Observations from two Arctic sites show that some surface layers are no longer freezing. This latest news bodes ill because melting permafrost causes increased release of greenhouse gases that will accelerate climate change. Combined with eventual oceanic methane hydrate degasification, runaway global warming could be in the offing. The only way to prevent that is for us to dramatically increase our use of renewable energy and to drastically curtail our fossil fuel consumption.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/08/news-arctic-permafrost-may-thaw-faster-than-expected/

Permafrost melting:
https://samslair.blogspot.com/search?q=Permafrost&max-results=20&by-date=true&m=1

Some Arctic Ground No Longer Freezing—Even in Winter

New data from two Arctic sites suggest some surface layers are no longer freezing. If that continues, greenhouse gases from permafrost could accelerate climate change.

Observations from two Arctic sites show that some surface layers are no longer freezing. This latest news bodes ill because melting permafrost causes increased release of greenhouse gases that will accelerate climate change. Combined with eventual oceanic methane hydrate degasification, runaway global warming could be in the offing. The only way to prevent that is for us to dramatically increase our use of renewable energy and to drastically curtail our fossil fuel consumption.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/08/news-arctic-permafrost-may-thaw-faster-than-expected/

Permafrost melting:
https://samslair.blogspot.com/search?q=Permafrost&max-results=20&by-date=true&m=1